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Conway's Game of Life

Conway's Game of Life is a cellular automaton that was created by John Horton Conway in 1970. It is a "zero-player game"; in other words, the result is completely determined by the initial configuration of cells according to various rules. The "universe" is an infinite grid of square cells (note that the simulator below is restricted to a finite size, in this case 50×50). Each cell can be in one of two states, "alive", or "dead". The following rules determine the change in configuration from one generation to the next:

  1. Any alive cell with exactly zero or one neighbours dies due to underpopulation.
  2. Any alive cell with more then three neighbours dies due to overcrowding.
  3. Any dead cell with exactly three neighbours becomes a live cell.

Based on these three rules, a wide array of beautiful and intriguing patterns can be created.

Instructions: To create the initial position, click on cells below to turn them "alive" (if you make a mistake, click on them again to turn them "dead"). Select the "Start Simulation" button below to start the simulation.

Delay between generations (in seconds):